A Travellerspoint blog

Namibia

and Zambia as well

sunny 28 °C

We can put a resounding tick next to Namibia! In three weeks we have covered over 5000 kilometres, camping (almost) all the way, and have dutifully pointed our cameras at pretty much everything a good tourist is supposed to. In our little two-wheel drive Polo we have rocked up to remote campsites and parked next to rows and rows of huge 4x4s, we have pitched our little pink 2 man tent in 5 minutes whilst others are still counting their tent poles, and we have eaten appropriately horribly camping food. Baboons have stolen our breakfast eggs, we’ve watched countless gorgeous sunsets, we’ve jumped out of aeroplanes (well, Rich has), we’ve shivered through the desert night, sweated through scorching days (no air-con), we’ve chased lions, hyenas and springboks, we’ve prospected for diamonds in a desert ghost town, we’ve looked at 100,000 seals, we’ve met Queen Elizabeth, we’ve smeared ochre all over our faces (well, Maya has), we’ve watched 40 elephants take over a waterhole, seen 5 rhino drinking at the same time, we’ve watched the sunrise from the top of a sand dune, we’ve had NO flat tires, we’ve driven 60 kilometres without turning a corner, and we’ve seen what the world will look like after the apocalypse.

Sand

Sand

Our route to Namibia from Malawi was straight forward. Crossing the border into Zambia we spent the first four days of our travels on safari in South Luangwa National Park with Jackalberry Safaris – run by Gavin and his girlfriend Rosie who were great people and showed us a great time, we heartily recommend them to anyone heading that way! The park was a beautiful place teeming with wildlife, where we had ropy encounters with elephants, saw three leopards, and countless hippos, crocs, buffalo, zebra, impala, lovebirds, eagles, pumbas, giraffes...the list goes on and on.

From there a bus to Lusaka, which we didn’t think much of, then another bus to Livingstone (watching the highly rated, and surprisingly brutal Undisputed 3, immediately followed by Undisputed 2) and Victoria Falls, which lived up to its reputation. As Todd put it, visiting the falls is an interactive experience – you are so close that you get drenched by the spray, and by drenched I mean literally as if you got in a bath with your clothes on. It’s quite amazing to be rained on from all directions at once, like the world’s best spa shower. We splurged on a micro-lite flight over the falls, which was an amazing experience and should be on everyone’s ‘do before you die’ list, and dropped off the edge of a cliff together (if you haven’t seen the vid yet check out Maya and Ric jump off a cliff on youtube, professionally shot by the lovely filmmakers Tamara and Suzi). Thanks to Patricia we also had a chance to witness the wonders of the Zambian health care system, when a patient who can hardly walk is directed to 4 different buildings miles apart only to be told they can’t run lab tests that day... (not to worry, she is well and facebooking like mad again).

Zambezi sunset, Victoria Falls on the left

Zambezi sunset, Victoria Falls on the left

After a few days debating where to head next, we got sick of thinking about it and jumped on a bus to Windhoek, where we said goodbye to Todd and Heather, organized a hire car and camping equipment, and set the controls for the heart of the (Namibian) bush.

A day of rest now before catching a bus to Cape Town tomorrow, and we are looking forward to doing nothing all day....

Elephant convoy, Etosha. The first herd of about 40 elephants to come and drink at Halali watering hole that afternoon.

Elephant convoy, Etosha. The first herd of about 40 elephants to come and drink at Halali watering hole that afternoon.


Tiny feeding. The smallest elephant we've ever seen was always guarded by his mum, aunties and siblings.

Tiny feeding. The smallest elephant we've ever seen was always guarded by his mum, aunties and siblings.


100,000 seals at Cape Cross, Skeleton Coast. Smelly.

100,000 seals at Cape Cross, Skeleton Coast. Smelly.


Camping in the Namib

Camping in the Namib


Deadvlei (the must-have Namibian photo)

Deadvlei (the must-have Namibian photo)


Dune running

Dune running


Kolmanskoppe Ghost town, deserted in the '50s

Kolmanskoppe Ghost town, deserted in the '50s


Fish River Canyon, 550m deep and 160km long

Fish River Canyon, 550m deep and 160km long

Posted by TattoodDuck 07:22 Archived in Namibia Tagged zambia namib etosha south_luangwa jackalberry

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Comments

Glad to read you enjoyed Namibia. It looks like we may have stayed at the same campsite in Opuwo!

Hope Cape Town finds you well, and remember, if you're ever in Canada you must let us show you a good time.

Todd & Heather

by Todd

Oh, and no flat tires?!?!?!? Sweet! Sorry I steered you wrong on tire insurance.

by Todd

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